Remember Franc Grom and his fragile easter eggs? These paper sculptures fall in the same category with a title “There’s no room for mistakes”.

Japanese artist Kiri Ken (ie. “Cutting Sword”) is creating fragile magic by cutting paper until she gets a desired form. Number of cuts is unimaginable and the result is a dreamy lace like paper artwork.

via This Is Colossal 

It would be good sometimes, to see that. A paper on your doorstep in the morning. You pick it up, make some coffee and sit down. You open the newspaper and there’s nothing. Nothing happened, there’s no news. What a relief. And then you wake up. 🙂

The series Nothing In The News is the work of Sideline Collective by Joseph Ernst and offers a little respite to information overload.

And you can also buy this newspaper, so you can have an empty news day anytime you want.

‘We offer the one thing you need more than anything else: “Nothing”. Absolutely nothing. Today, and today only, there is Nothing in the News. Enjoy it whilst you can,’ says Ernst.

This is one adorable couple. Valencia based couple Anna Devís and Daniel Rueda each have their own instagram accounts where they playfully explore shapes and structures of everyday life. They find an inventive visual story in architecture, where most of us would just pass by.

Clean witty images from their travels are a true inspirational boost in the Instagram timeline jungle of mediocre and unimaginative photos. These two are definitely on Instagram must follow list.

Follow them on Instagram: Daniel Rueda, Anna Devís

So, we all know how to separate recyclable trash by now. And we are kind of proud that we are doing something good for a planet. But do we really? We throw trash in fancy organized bins and forget about it. We don’t think about the unimaginable amounts of package we buy and then throw out.

That’s why photographer Antoine Repessé stopped throwing away his recyclable rubbish in 2011 to make a point. Four years later he started turning that trash into a series of photographs with a strong message. Powerful images confront us with a filthy reality of unimaginable piles of trash we produce. Yes our own trash is pilling up and we choose not to see it. We all recycle, that should be enough, right?

Antoine hopes his project can inspire a change. “We’re often told about the quantity of waste we produce, but I think the impact of a picture can be more powerful than a ton of words”.

more info: Antoine Repessé, fb
via: DeMilked

Have you ever wonder that? Graphic designer Mathieu Blanchet made a series of minimalist posters of well known cartoons and movies and suggested a different ending to them.

Although I respect his idea, things would never be the same if that happened. It’s almost blasphemy. Because let’s face it Wile E. Coyote could never ever win. Road Runner is just to smart for him. That’s life.

Super Mario Bros, The Smurfs

Babe, Dastardly and Muttley

Toy Story, Man in Black

Have you ever found yourself wanting to rearrange products in a supermarket, just because composition of the stuff on the shelves would look better? Don’t get me started on colours that don’t go together in the sweets section. Shelves would look so much better if for instance chocolates would be stacked into a rainbow.

Well anyway, this are the things I thought of first when I saw the installations by Carson Davis Brown. He artistically rearranges things in stores without their permission.

Mass is a site specific installation project about creating visual disruptions in places of mass (to date: big-box stores, super-centers, etcetera). At an intersection between Street Art and Land Art, installations are made without permission, using found materials within the retail landscape. The works are made, photographed, then left to be experienced by passersby and ultimately dissembled by location staff. Photo documentation of Mass works are initially exhibited in a consumer landscape. Printed, framed (in unsold frames) and exhibited in-stores; all without permission.

Carson Davis Brown: fb / web / instagram
via: booooooom

Illustrator Nikita Golubev (aka ProBoyNick) from Moscow, Russia, found a new media for his illustrations. He transforms dirty vehicles covered with layers of dust and dirt into works of art.

This ongoing Dirty Car Art project is bringing beauty to grit and grime of his city and I can’t wait to see more of his masterpieces.

Nikita Golubev: fb / behance / instagram
via: my modern met